Creed

On Sundays and at First-Class Feasts, the celebrant approaches the altar for the Nicene Creed, genuflecting before entering the chancel. [For weekday and other masses, Maundy Thursday, and the Vigil of Easter, the Creed is omitted.] During the Creed, all face the altar. For the Creed, genuflection is made at “and was made man” and a bow at “who with the Father and the Son is worshiped and glorified,” as indicated in the Altar Book. The celebrant then genuflects and retires to sit in the sedilia for the Hymn of the Day.

The Western rite does provide that the genuflection begin at "and was incarnate" but this seems to suggest an unseemly confusion between Jesus' incarnation and his state of humiliation.

7 comments:

Father Eckardt said...

Some authorities place the Creed after the sermon, as it is found in LW and in some SBH orders. Comments?

Dcn. Muehlenbruch said...

The SBH, p. 54, places the Creed after the Gospel. This is followed by the hymn of the day. Then the sermon is preached.

Father Eckardt said...

Sorry, I meant LSB.

Venkman said...

I'm guessing the answer to this lies with Vatican II.

Father Eckardt said...

I don't have the resource with me right now, but I would guess the Credo comes after the sermon in the Tridentine Mass. Could be wrong, though.

Dcn. Muehlenbruch said...

In the Tridentine Mass the sermon, if there is one, does come before the Creed.

Andrew Grams said...

In Anglo-Catholic circles, the genuflection is at "and was made man." The congregation and celebrant remain in this position and rise at "and He descended into hell." Also, and I believe this follows the Tridentine formula, the creed comes after the Gospel reading, before the sermon.

Fr. BF Eckardt, Editor-in-chief, Gottesdienst