Introit

The celebrant and attendants face the altar for the Introit. The celebrant kisses the altar upon arrival.

My variation: At the intonation of the Introit, the celebrant begins his approach to the altar from the lowest point. He makes the sign of the cross upon himself three times: first, at his first step, second, pausing briefly at the rail, and third, upon arrival at the altar, whereupon he genuflects and, laying both hands flat upon the altar, kisses it. During the Gloria Patri he (and all) also bows for Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Ghost.

6 comments:

Father Eckardt said...

The most recent rubrics allow for an "Entrance Hymn" or "Psalm" to replace the Introit. I do not believe this is helpful or traditional. Does anyone have any background on such an innovation?

Mark said...

What is the purpose of the kissing of the altar?

Father Eckardt said...

Because of the relics in there, of coruse . . .

Father Eckardt said...

. . . our church is St. Paul's. I think maybe one of his fingernails is under our mensa.

Seriously, there is a salutary reason for kissing the altar. It is the place where the Body of Christ will soon be laid.

Anonymous said...

the body of christ will also be laid in each communicant's mouth. will each of them also be kissed? must he run around kissing every place the body of christ will be? hmmmm

Rev.Fr.Burnell F Eckardt said...

Mr. Anonymous, allow me to explain. The reason the altar is traditionally kissed--yes, traditionally, as in, none of this is made up--has to do with the fact that it is the sacred place the Sacrament is consecrated and from which it is given. The kissing of the altar is not something the celebrant "must" do; it is something he is free to do, as a means of signifying this truth.

Now, if you wish to enter into serious discussion of these matters, please leave your name.

Fr. BF Eckardt, Editor-in-chief, Gottesdienst